The Truth About Being In Space

So you’ve decided you want to become a rocket scientist? Well, that’s great, but there actually are no “rocket scientists”; there are rocket engineers and scientists who study the field of aeronautics. The term “rocket scientist” is used as a general indicator of someone in the aeronautics field, in popular culture. Becoming a “rocket scientists”, as it is so often called, is no easy task and it takes a great deal of schooling. The first step, however, TV savings, is figuring out which portion of space studies you are interested in. Rocket engineers can work on the electrical engineering side of things, or they may the mechanical engineering side of it. The best undergraduate degree to obtain while working on becoming a rocket scientist is Aerospace Engineering. There are a limited number of programs around the country, but each is wonderful and offers students a great opportunity to learn the field. In certain instances a BS in aerospace engineering will get you in the door and help you begin your career in rocket science; however a Master’s degree or a PHd in a more specialized field will move you up the rank more rapidly and the organic growth of the career path with an advanced degree is significantly better. Orbital Science, Aeronautics, and Astronomy are advanced degrees that can easily help you climb the latter of rocket science success.

29 Jul, 2013 | Comments are off

History of NASA

The space race was a trying time for American culture. People had a common enemy, feared by all, in the Soviet Union. It was an era in which America was determined to prove its superiority, and fought to establish itself as still dominant. With this in mind, president Dwight D. Eisenhower founded the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in 1958, known today commonly by its acronym – NASA. NASA was in many ways an extension to the NACA (National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics, which had already been researching flight for the government for 40 years at the time of NASA’s founding). NASA has come a long way since its founding, innovating technologies that we use everyday today. You can even watch astronauts on TV 24/7 with NASA channels found on ExpertSatellite.com/direct-tv-packages.html! Let’s take a look back to see how NASA became what it is today.

President John F. Kennedy was the first president to really push NASA into the limelight, turning NASA into a household name. In an effort to unify America, divided during the 1960s because of war, Kennedy gave NASA a task: put a man on the moon by the end of the decade. When NASA succeeded at doing just that, the agency wrote itself permanently into the history books.

NASA was working diligently on other technologies all the while, making serious advancements in the aeronautics industry. The agency built the first weather and communications satellites, revolutionizing the entire world. This technology would eventually lead to the advancements that enable satellite communication today, something we depend on daily in the modern world.

Later, NASA would work on a reusable vehicle to provide access to space whenever necessary. The Space Shuttle, completed in 1981, was involved in over one hundred missions before being decommissioned in 2011.

NASA’s arguably greatest achievement, however, entered orbit in the year 2000. Representative of a massive amount of work by multiple countries, NASA oversaw the largest collaborative space travel effort in human history: the International Space Station. Built and managed with the cooperation of 16 nations, the ISS ensures a permanent human presence in space for the foreseeable future, and far beyond. Research and experimentation is being done in space to this day thanks to this single crowning achievement.

NASA has had a long, storied past, and the organization continues to grow well into the future. As long as America yearns for space travel, NASA will be there.

12 Jun, 2013 | Comments are off

What It’s Like To Work On a Space Shuttle

Whether you are simply interested in space or even have ambitions of someday becoming an astronaut, there is a good chance that you are at least somewhat curious as to what it is like to live and work on a space shuttle. As you can imagine, it is nothing like being on solid ground here on Earth. Working on a space shuttle requires a lot of special training.

When shuttles are sent into space, they eventually leave the Earth’s atmosphere and reach a point of zero gravity. As a result, those who Read the rest of this entry »

22 May, 2013 | Comments are off

Space Shuttle Missions: Not For The Faint-Hearted

A walk on the moon is far from a walk in the park. Space travel presents many physical and psychological challenges for astronauts that you might not expect. Here are a few things you might not anticipate experiencing on a space shuttle mission.

Nausea
After astronauts experience the changes in gravitational forces and the extreme acceleration needed to get them into space, you might think that the danger of space-sickness passes, but this Read the rest of this entry »

4 Apr, 2013 | Comments are off

The Truth About Shuttles In Space

It has been in relatively recent history that man has been to space, and then on the moon. This has changed the way man thinks about how the Universe is, but the truth is space shuttles have evolved into something that would have never been thought of years ago.

The space shuttle program in the United States may have ended, but the dream of man living and working in space has not. The recent rover landing on Read the rest of this entry »

18 Oct, 2012 | Comments are off

Ten Things To Know When Building Your Backyard Shuttle

1. You will want to launch your shuttle to the east. Space shuttles are always launched east, to take advantage of the earth’s rotation.
2. Make sure everybody goes to the bathroom before they get in the shuttle. This was a serious problem at the beginning of NASA’s history.
3. Always launches over a large body of water, to make sure that debris cannot possibly fall on anyone.
4. Clean the outside of the space shuttle before you take off, so that it slides through the atmosphere more easily.
5. Be sure to close all the Read the rest of this entry »

15 Oct, 2012 | Comments are off

What The NASA Science Center Is Really Like

What The NASA Science Center Is Really Like

The NASA Science Center is both overwhelming and inspiring. It features many educational and hands on demonstrations as well as features and informative tour of NASA Science Center. However, at the heart of the immensity of NASA Science Center it is a facility for learning and educating.

One of the most inspiring aspects of the NASA Science Center is that it is open to the public and gives viewers and inside glimpse as to what really goes on behind Read the rest of this entry »

11 Oct, 2012 | Comments are off

Get Inside a Working Space Shuttle

Get Inside A Working Space Shuttle

Visiting NASA opens the door to many insights, observations, and impressions that the space shuttle missions have to offer. There is an abundance of insight one can gather from exploring the inner workings of a space shuttle.

Only when you visit the NASA Science Center can you really take the time out of your day to discover what it means to travel in space. The beauty and architecture of a space shuttle is on full display and you allow yourself the opportunity of asking questions to Read the rest of this entry »

9 Oct, 2012 | Comments are off

How To Become a Rocket Scientist

So you’ve decided you want to become a rocket scientist? Well, that’s great, but there actually are no “rocket scientists”; there are rocket engineers and scientists who study the field of aeronautics. The term “rocket scientist” is used as a general indicator of someone in the aeronautics field, in popular culture.

Becoming a “rocket scientists”, as it is so often called, is no easy task and it takes a great deal of schooling. The first step, however, is figuring out which portion of space studies you are interested in. Rocket engineers can work on the electrical engineering side Read the rest of this entry »

8 Oct, 2012 | Comments are off